William 9×17: You say it as if you have a choice.


William63.jpg

Stop, the love you save may be your own.

Reportedly, the idea for Scully to give William up for adoption was mandated by Carter and Spotnitz. Duchovny, Anderson, and executive producer John Shiban were not happy with this turn of events, due to them being parents and feeling that the action was not realistic, but “grudgingly consented”. – Wikipedia (William)

We have reached the high point of my Season 9 frustration, or the low point of my fandom, however you choose to look at it. I warn you now this will be long.

For all intents and purposes, baby William is gone, Carter said. After all, you can’t have Scully and Mulder chasing aliens in a future movie with a toddler tagging along.

“It was a problem we knew existed, and we couldn’t figure out how we were going to handle it,” he said. “This seemed like the best way.”

“A problem”? And whose fault was that?

There was some debate about what to do and what the best thing to do was. That idea (giving William up for adoption) was from Chris and Frank. It’s a safe place for the baby. I don’t think anybody wanted to continue playing jeopardy for the baby any longer. It started to become for all of us painful. – John Shiban

YES.

“We knew that the fans would be asking why we had Scully go through the pregnancy arc to begin with if she was just going to give the baby up for adoption,” said executive producer Frank Spotnitz.

YES.

“And it was a legitimate question.”

YES.

“I had a lot of reservations about that storyline and about her giving up the baby, and was not at all sure that it was the right thing to do. But in the end, I think it was the right thing to do, because it becomes unsavory. And I think everybody — David and Chris, especially — felt that the baby was going to be an obstacle to us in any future movies.”

Again, whose fault was that?

“The decision was very difficult,” added Spotnitz. “But realistically, in no small way, it made it easier to one day do another movie.

Here’s the thing everyone seems to be missing: It doesn’t matter how well you write the movie if no one wants to see it.

We have to follow you to the theater, remember?

And as painful, unsavory, frustrating and problematic as the storylines surrounding William have been, nothing is worse than after all that taking him suddenly away with a flimsy excuse. This is the kind of story choice that turns people off. All this buildup about William as the second coming and then, boom. He’s gone.

The job the latter half of Season 9 was burdened with was wrapping up emotional loose ends. That’s fine as far as it goes. But if a movie franchise was a goal, then the stories should actually be ramping up towards something epic.

Instead this has a note of finality and there’s no presented reason to wait and see what happens to the budding Mulder brood. Don’t put a period where there should be a comma. If you are going to get rid of William, make it temporary. Give your audience hope, somehow, of a reunion. Or, how about we just let William be a normal baby? He’d be older by the movies anyway! Let him go to grandma’s if he needs a place to hide out.

Like so many unpleasant surprises this season, I had no idea what was coming when “William” first aired. But just like with “Jump the Shark” (9×15), as soon as we hit the end of the teaser, I knew. Last time, I freaked out. This time, I freaked out… and threw my hands over my head in both contempt and surrender. Why shouldn’t one more thing go horribly wrong?

I think it’s safe to say I was too upset to look at the episode objectively, but this time I gave it the old college try. And you know what? Other than the end result being such a source of frustration, the episode is otherwise a pretty good one. It’s quiet with a lot of exposition, but it manages to be surprisingly emotional.

David Duchovny’s back directing and I think he makes some great choices here. Gillian Anderson and Jeffrey Owens also do an impressive job acting, especially Gillian as a thoroughly confused and conflicted Scully. And I’m happy to find out what became of Spender. That, at least, is a welcome surprise here right before the end.

The scene where Scully examines Spender/Miller/Mulder is easily the best in the episode. It’s shot very intimately, intimately enough to let us know that despite her protests, Scully wonders if this might be Mulder too. I try to remind Scully that the network wouldn’t waste David Duchovny’s face like that, but I’m not sure she hears me.

Eventually, grand scheme working according to plan, Spender worms his way to William and injects him some magical form of magnetite. Et voilà! No more Super Baby, no more messiah.

And why does he do it? To save the world? To condemn the world? No, to stick it to his dead(?) dad. And, of course, to get rid of the prophecy plot because even 1013 doesn’t know what to do with it anymore.

The deus ex machina nature of these machinations is frustrating enough, but I could deal and would even be relieved to see the cosmic child plot go no matter how it went. But then… the adoption. Scully lets Spender get into her head and makes a permanent, life-altering decision because of it. 

Scully’s baby has been under threat for a long time now. If anything, she’s recently found out that the Super Soldiers don’t actually want to harm her baby, though they do want him for their own purposes. Why would she suddenly decide to give William up based on the word of Spender who is a confirmed liar like his father before him?

And let’s say danger will rear its seven heads from time to time. We’re supposed to believe the Super Soldiers are everywhere and they are legion. They can’t find a baby on a farm? They found a pregnant Scully out in the middle of nowhere before in “Existence” (8×21). They will eventually find William in Wyoming too. You’re really telling me Mulder and Scully aren’t better equipped to protect him than Farmer John?

“God has His reasons and His ways.”

So does Chris Carter, but it’s much harder to submit to his.

Verdict:

If you’ll allow me, I’d like to tell you a story.

Once upon a time, long, long ago, in the book of 2 Kings, lived a woman we only know as the Shunamite woman. She was a barren woman, but she had long ago made her peace with that. She was also a good woman, a god-fearing woman, a pleasant woman. And she was married to a man older than Sean Connery.

One day she asked Sean Connery saying, “Honey, you know the prophet has to travel through our area quite often. Wouldn’t it be nice to add a guest room he could stay in? We’ve been talking about fixing the house up anyway.”

So Sean Connery agreed because, like all wise wives, she allowed him to think it was his idea. The addition was built and the prophet Elisha stayed in it and found it quite a bit more comfortable than the Holiday Inn. Grateful for her unsolicited generosity, the prophet asked the Shunamite woman if there was anything he could do for her, any way he could help her. After all, she’d been such a blessing to him. But the Shunamite woman said no, she had everything she needed, thanks ever so.

Then the prophet’s servant spilled the beans: Not only was the Shunamite woman barren, her husband was older than Sean Connery. Surely a child, a child would bless her.

The prophet then goes back to the Shunamite woman and tells her that he will pray to God and God will give her a son. But the Shunamite woman protests. After all, she’d made her peace with being childless long ago. She couldn’t stand to get her hopes up for nothing. But sure enough, soon she had a baby boy.

Sean Jr. grew up healthy and strong, but one day when he was still a young boy, he got a headache, and he sat on his mother’s lap all day. And in the evening, he died. The Shunamite woman took him and laid him on his bed and locked the door behind her. Then, instead of the minivan, she asked her husband for the keys to the Mustang. She had a quick errand, she said, nothing to worry about. 

The Shunamite woman gunned that engine and drove straight to the prophet. After speeding through many a stop sign, she barged into his office unannounced. “You gave me this child. I didn’t ask for him,” she said. “You gave him to me and you give him back.”

The prophet, of course, complied.

My point is simple. William was not our idea. We didn’t ask for him. We were fine without him. But you, Dear 1013, brought him into this. You brought him into this and I’d like him back… please.

B

Snippets:

The above is the Salome Paraphrase Version of the Bible. Not available for purchase.

I was in denial for a while after this. I really thought Mulder and Scully would search for ways to get their baby back, or that his adopted parents would be killed by the Super Soldiers and there would be a rescue mission.

Chris Owens got the worst makeup jobs on this show.

Even after having watched and knowing what Spender is really up to, it’s hard to see someone do things they shouldn’t to a baby.

The Mulderisms that Spender makes are an especially nice touch.

It actually would have been more compelling if William were taken and Mulder and Scully had to get him back.

See what happens when you make a baby, Chris? All subsequent decisions have to be filtered through the lens of parenthood. That includes parent writers.

And then she sang “Joy to the World” just to torment us all.

What verification do we have that the injection worked? ‘Cause no, a still mobile doesn’t count.

The decision doesn’t make instinctive sense. A mother would sooner go into hiding with her baby than give him up.

I watched Independence Day, however much Mulder may have desecrated the poster. It is possible to have youngins running around and still have an epic alien battle.

We now have DNA evidence that Mulder isn’t Bill Mulder’s son, but Cigarette-Smoking Man’s.

I do like hearing “Michael, Row Your Boat Ashore” at the end. That’s a sweet, sentimental touch. Ergo, it must’ve been David Duchovny’s.

If Spender’s telling the truth, and William was the one thing the aliens needed to effect colonization, then we can all pack it up and go home.

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46 responses to “William 9×17: You say it as if you have a choice.

  1. Ugh. The baby. Anything: baby being kidnapped, adopted parents being killed, shit, even BABY being killed would be better than what happened. But, since this happened after season 6, in my mind, it’s like it never happened at all.

  2. Yet another great excuse not to re-watch these: I’m a mom now and they would make even less than zero sense.

  3. “Older than Sean Connery.” I died.

  4. The whole time I just kept thinking, “Ok, this isn’t a bad episode. Actually, it’s pretty good considering what we’ve had this season. But how on earth does this lead to Scully giving up William?” Then I find out it was based on a suggestion from Spender of POSSIBLE violence and hiding and running for William for the rest of his life. I lost it after that. Anger. Tears. Cursing. All of it. What the hell, CC? What the actual hell? He’s normal now (because OF COURSE there was a vaccine) and she still can’t keep him?? This episode was honestly worse than I dreamed it would be concerning awfully deciding to give him up. Also because CC’s reasoning behind giving him up was just so pathetic.

    Remember when I said that, for me, the most out of character thing Mulder did was leave Scully and William after season 8? Well this is the most out of character thing Scully ever had to do. At least make me feel like Scully really had NO CHOICE. And the suggestion of danger does not count. No parent would ever do that based on this situation, especially Scully. She would fight to the death to protect William. She would not trust someone else to do that. Did any one of the writers stop to think that they were basically ripping Scully’s heart out? Oh, a baby wouldn’t be good to have around in a fight against aliens? Oh gee, well, no worries! Here is a giant eraser. That should do the trick. Oh, you can still see a faint imprint of it under everything else that you write over that? Well, tough. That’s what happens. William is now the ghost that haunts Mulder and Scully. He will forever. I just hope they really deal with this properly in the revival.

    I will say that you can really feel David’s presence in this episode. His love and respect for Scully/Gillian is seen in how he films her. Scully shines and looks so good. I also finally really feel the mother/son connection. David really helped Gillian bring back the Scully we lost so long ago. I missed her. I just wish I didn’t have to see her go through this.

    God damn it, Maggie could have watched William while they fought the aliens!! Ok…I’m sorry. I’m done now.

    • Oh, oh, AND this whole adoption happens in less than a week. Is that even possible? Sculls is making the most important decision of her son’s life and she barely sleeps on the idea. Strike while the iron is hot? And then they manage to find the most perfect, wholesome family who lives in the middle of nowhere right away? What about background checks or anything? Even done personally by Scully or Doggett/Reyes. I don’t have any idea about adoption procedures, but I can’t imagine it’s this easy. Although maybe I’m wrong.

      I’m not even going to touch on the fact that she did this without trying to find Mulder and talk to him. I have to stop thinking about this because I’m just getting mad again.

      • Background checks! Background checks on their neighbors! On their state and local governments where there might be Super Soldiers hiding! The whole plot falls apart faster than Scully gave him up.

        And we *know* she knew how to contact Mulder thanks to “Trust No 1”. If both he and the baby have to be afraid of the Super Soldiers, why don’t they all go off and be afraid together?

    • Of COURSE there was an insta-cure! Didn’t you learn anything from Season 8???

      I’m sorry. I’m sorry. Let me stop the snark.

      There are many ways to sideline a baby. This was not a plausible one… for ALL the reasons you said.

      Oh, a baby wouldn’t be good to have around in a fight against aliens? Oh gee, well, no worries! Here is a giant eraser. That should do the trick.

      They clearly didn’t understand that this would be a constant dark cloud hanging over the characters from now until eternity. Either, they have to in some way make peace with William or this plot will forever taint their history. You don’t just become parents, suddenly stop being parents and move on. That’s why Scully acting normal for the rest of the season ended up bothering fans so much. How can she be normal??

      I will say that you can really feel David’s presence in this episode. His love and respect for Scully/Gillian is seen in how he films her. Scully shines and looks so good. I also finally really feel the mother/son connection. David really helped Gillian bring back the Scully we lost so long ago. I missed her.

      I felt the same thing. You can tell he loves this characters and that he’s a closet sentimentalist under that sardonic streak. “Joy to the World” was his idea… Darn him to heck.

      • Joy to the World was his idea? Ugh…of course. Twist the knife deeper. It was a lovely call back, though.

        Do you actually know the back story as to how David came to direct this episode? Do you know why they didn’t actually have him in it as well?

        • I know that according to CC, they’d been in contact all season. The plan for a long time was for DD to come back and direct an episode. He still loved the show and it sounds like absence had made the heart grow even fonder. The only concern once the end was announced was whether scheduling would allow him to do both “William” and “The Truth”. I think both directing the ep and acting in both would have required more time, but I’m speculating.

  5. “Here’s the thing everyone seems to be missing: It doesn’t matter how well you write the movie if no one wants to see it.
    We have to follow you to the theater, remember?”

    Ahh, the first crux (of several) of IWTB. You nailed it with this:

    “But if a movie franchise was a goal, then the stories should actually be ramping up towards something epic.”

    If you think about it, we have ample evidence of how correct you are, Salome. I’ll paraphrase this since it’s been a while since I read it, but in your review of Fight the Future or just before it, you said Chris Carter is moving his chess pieces into place for the big reveal in the movie. He spent most of a season planning and executing what would pay off big time in the movie theater. It also primes the audience doing it this way. Think about it – we sat through many hours of hour-long movie previews, getting us excited and more invested in the movie that was coming with each hour that we watched. There’s no way we weren’t going to see it after that. It’s too bad he wasn’t able to utilize that same strategy in season 9 to end on a high note that could easily lead to a movie down the line. Sideline William at grandma’s until he’s old enough to participate, or have him taken, for example, so that the audience expects Mulder and Scully to start a new crusade to find him. Instead of ending the series on a somber note, we would end knowing that they are starting a new journey. Even though the messiah storyline was too much, they could have changed it to fit a new vision with him still in it.
    When I first watched it I didn’t have a child and it still seemed like an empty reason. Monica’s line, “you say it as if you had a choice” left me yelling “you DO have a choice!” over and over again. Now that I have a daughter I know that without a doubt it’s just not believable. You just wouldn’t do that. And if there was a really compelling, heartbreaking reason – not that fast, and not without asking the father. And certainly not knowing that there are undefeatable super soldiers out there that look just like everyone else! How do you know the adoptive parents aren’t them???
    It funny, it’s like William (being the literal product of Mulder and Scully)came to represent their romance in Chris Carter’s mind, and you know we can’t have evidence that their relationship isn’t platonic.
    So best to squash that.
    Sorry this was long!

    • I have nothing to back this up, it’s just speculation on my part. But it seems to me it’s taken the franchise years to recover from the audience disappointment in Season 9 especially. The momentum was lost.

      And because the momentum was lost, Fox wasn’t about to sink a lot of money either into a new XF film or into promoting it. And also, but the time of IWTB, TXF had lost the vehicle for weekly promotion it had every week just through airing on television.

      For all “the date” was set, the end of Season 9 felt mostly final. There wasn’t a sense like there was with “Requiem” that we desperately needed the action to continue. “Requiem” is emotionally hard for me to take, but it’s good evidence that Chris Carter’s vision could have/would have been effective if business hadn’t gotten in the way of their creativity.

      Sideline William at grandma’s until he’s old enough to participate

      Seriously, though!

      I think they underestimated, possibly since they weren’t parents and probably since Mulder and Scully had already been through so many losses, how tragic losing their child would make these characters. And for all the drama in the past, The X-Files had maintained that sense of adventure and expectant journey.

      And I agree! Why the rush???? She’s been living with him in peace since “Providence”. Now he’s cured… which I still can’t believe that she took at face value… and she has to give him up right away so that she can’t change her mind? What if he’s not cured and the Super Soldiers locate him because of his powers? What then, huh?

      There are no Super Soldiers in the SSA who can figure out his identity?

      I just… sigh.

      • Yeah, once a character starts to turn tragic it’s hard to turn it around, but I have faith that they can! Maybe that’s why they are starting Mulder out in a dark place in the revival. We will have to see!

  6. I’ve kept a lot of my thoughts about your reviews of this season to myself–we all have our opinions and that’s fine. You’ve spent a lot of time lamenting about the loss of Mulder and looking at the series through rose-colored glasses (aside from a few really great episodes, the first two seasons were pretty bleak, and still trying to find their footing), and constantly haranguing about the new characters and not appreciating it for what it was trying to do.

    Regardless.

    This episode was, in a lot of ways, awful.

    Yes–parts of it are heartbreaking. I remember back in the day the whole thing with CC saying William was a problem and so on, and it bothered me to no end. I hate the same reactions as you. It didn’t make sense. There was no point in creating a pregnancy/baby arc and then act as if you had no control over it.

    But, after the series ended, I stopped watching cold turkey. I couldn’t do it to myself. It was too sad. Almost a year later, I caught an episode on TV–William. And everything was fine for a while. I remembered how sad it was and all that, but there was one moment that got me.

    “I have seen my share of the hideous, of the disgusting and the repellent, but you, Sir, are the most perfect expression I will ever see of all that is vile and hateful in life.”

    I burst out laughing.

    For a very long time, it was obvious that people were taking themselves too seriously, and the dialogue reflected that. The language was often way too formal, way beyond the way people actually speak, even those who are scientists. The dialogue was full of itself, as if CC and Co were trying so hard to write stories that they forgot how to write.

    But that one moment…I just couldn’t take it. It was funny and it was horrible and it was over the top. No one says things like that. “But YOU, sir…” Are you kidding me? I mean, I love Gillian Anderson. She’s great. But she couldn’t make that line work. It wasn’t heartwrenching. It wasn’t angsty. It was HILARIOUS.

    This was not a good episodes for so many reasons, but I wouldn’t say that there was any acting in this episode that redeemed it.

    • If you have another opinion then all the more reason you should post it! We’re all just sharing our thoughts and our feelings here. This is a dialogue.

      (aside from a few really great episodes, the first two seasons were pretty bleak, and still trying to find their footing)

      I have to agree, of course, that the show was still finding its footing. But I personally really enjoy Season 1. “Gender Bender” is the episode that got me watching. And after seeing “Darkness Falls”, I didn’t want to miss another episode. There are classics like the Pilot, which was a great start to the show, and “Ice”, “One Breath”, “Tooms”, “Eve”, “E.B.E.” and “The Erlenmeyer Flask”. Even episodes that were only so-so were entertaining and memorable like “Squeeze”, “Fire”, “Fallen Angel”, and even “Ghost in the Machine” which is a guilty pleasure of mine. Season 1 is fun to watch.

      And Season 2 has long been one of my favorite seasons. Again, classics like “Irresistible”, “Humbug”, “Anasazi” and “One Breath”. “F. Emasculata” and “Colony/End Game” are among my personal favorites. And again, even lesser episodes like “Die Hand Die Verlezt”, “Our Town”, and “Soft Light” are fun to watch.

      On the other hand, the mediocre episodes of Season 9 don’t have enough entertainment value for me to watch them “just because.”

      constantly haranguing about the new characters and not appreciating it for what it was trying to do.

      Hmm? I’m not sure where you’re coming from on that because I’ve been pro-Doggett & Reyes. I’ve spent the season trying to figure out why even though they had potential, they never fully gelled with the show or the audience. And in doing so, I’ve strongly argued that they needed a different format and a different feel in order to shine. They needed more episodes like “John Doe”, “4-D”, “Release” and “Audrey Pauley”. And they really needed out from under the shadow of Mulder and Scully. Yes, I love Mulder and Scully. But I gave these characters a fair try then and I’m doing it again now. Season 9 has been largely unsuccessful and I’m just trying to think my way to why that was.

      For a very long time, it was obvious that people were taking themselves too seriously, and the dialogue reflected that. The language was often way too formal, way beyond the way people actually speak, even those who are scientists. The dialogue was full of itself, as if CC and Co were trying so hard to write stories that they forgot how to write.

      Yes! That was a large part of the problem I had with “Provenance” and “Providence”. But, to be fair, the use of highbrow language on this show is old. It’s just that when the stories were good and we were invested in the characters, love covered a multitude of sins. I thought that line was incredibly hokey too.

      This was not a good episode for so many reasons, but I wouldn’t say that there was any acting in this episode that redeemed it.

      Other than the way it devolved toward the end, I still think Gillian Anderson gave a more nuanced performance than she’s been giving all season. You could feel her hope and disgust and confusion. I suspect David being back on set had something to do with it.

      This episode has never made me sad. Frustrated and angry, yes. Sad, no. The plot is too absurd.

    • “I have seen my share of the hideous, of the disgusting and the repellent, but you, Sir, are the most perfect expression I will ever see of all that is vile and hateful in life.”

      Just imagine Gillian saying this in her mind to CC while acting it out, and it all becomes quite funny 😉

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  9. As Scully desperately wanted a child of her own, I’m glad William was brought into the picture. I don’t like the alien direction they took him, though. And I’m still confused on the matter of curing him. If Spender gave him the magnatite, why would he still be sought after? We even see what he can no longer move the mobile at the end of the episode.

    • Indeed! Why would he still be sought after? But Spender indicates that the Super Soldiers will believe once a messiah, always a messiah. Or that they can somehow change him back.

      According to the script, as everything on this show, the ending is purposefully ambiguous. Is the fact that the mobile doesn’t move proof that he can no longer make it move?

  10. The dark spot hanging over the rest of the series is THIS damn plot line!!!! I mean, I’m glad they brought it up in IWTB and will obviously be touching on it in the revival but goodness I wish they had NEVER done it in the first place!

    It’s like on TV shows where they allow their leads to get together and then have no where to take them because the writers don’t realize there is still storytelling available after the leads enter into a full on romance, so they break up! That’s what this always felt like and the quotes you start off with just drive that point home (I’m SO glad I never knew the points of view for CC on this one because WHAT?!?! SERIOUSLY?!?!).

    There is still storytelling available if they keep their child! Just like all the ideas brought up just in this comment section – have William taken and they have to get him back, have them run with him and raise him but then let grandma take him when Mulder/Scully end up chasing aliens again (I mean, can you imagine everything post The Truth to IWTB if they had had William with them?!?! ) … there were better, more in character, options for William and none of them were chosen which is so saddening.

    I was always down for William’s existence mostly because I was hopeful it would give Scully and Mulder even more dimensions to their characters – but he didn’t serve that end AT ALL and so in that regard I’m glad he went, but the whole plot around WHY is just so unbelievable even by The X-Files standard.

    • If they were going to hem and haw about his paternity, yes. If they were going to make him a baby messiah, yes. If they were going to build him up to extreme heights and then throw him away when they got tired of writing for him, YES.

      It’s like on TV shows where they allow their leads to get together and then have no where to take them because the writers don’t realize there is still storytelling available after the leads enter into a full on romance, so they break up!

      *cough*The Revival*cough*

      There were ways, there were, for them to keep the baby and keep him out of site.

      And you’re right. Funny how being a mom seemed to shrink Scully’s character in Season 9 rather than causing her to stretch and grow. I would have loved to see the usually aloof Scully more openly affectionate, for instance.

      • I mean – I get that people break up in real life – but, seriously?!?! Mulder and Scully? It had better be a darn good reason (not ‘the darkness is taking you over’) and it had better be resolved quick.

        “Funny how being a mom seemed to shrink Scully’s character in Season 9 rather than causing her to stretch and grow. I would have loved to see the usually aloof Scully more openly affectionate, for instance.”

        This is would have been so beautiful to see – and not openly affectionate toward random women she meets in a cafe and then brings to her house (I’m still not over TrustNo1).

        • Chris himself has said they’re very much heroes in the romantic literary tradition. That means they’re largely extreme and unrealistic; they’re ideals. Romanticism is the opposite of realism. I just don’t understand how they go from committed warriors to a common couple so readily. But then, there was IWTB…

          This is would have been so beautiful to see – and not openly affectionate toward random women she meets in a cafe and then brings to her house (I’m still not over TrustNo1).

          Who is???

  11. Oh and I agree fully though that the rest of the episode is actually quite good – GA once again shows how amazing she is (which I would also attribute to DD being back on set and his directing as well) and then of course it’s wonderful to have Spender back. I enjoy Chris Owens and he did not disappoint in this episode. Plus Doggett and Reyes being all “This is Mulder” and Scully looking at them like “oh, honey, you have no idea do you…” is so wonderful.

  12. I know its been ranted to death, but I want my turn, too. We went EIGHT FRICKIN YEARS without any new X Files (which turned out to be disappointing) and 6 before that. Listening to all the recent interviews about why XF failed in 2002 (9/11, increased government trust, etc) makes me think that CC and co knew damned well that there would be no XF for awhile. And yet they left us with this shit. William could have been dealt with in a dozen different ways that didnt involve essentially crushing the hearts of your fan base (and in the midst of all the wrap ups towards the finale, its especially brutal). They KNEW XF was ending, they could have easily written Will out of the scene, but still very much a presence in their lives. I remember hating it when I was 17, I hate it even more at 31. In fact the whole thing makes me legit angry. The whole MSR plot line in season 9 is like a big fat “fuck you” to the shippers, which is tremendously brutal. Its just a way to kick everyone in the face and it ends the entire series on such a sour note, which is too bad because Reyes and Doggett centric episodes were actually awesome (and I like them a helluva lot more on the 2nd time around when Im not anxiously anticipating the series finale).

    • Join the club. This is a safe place to exhale. LOL!

      I do think they thought there was going to be a movie, but I think the underestimated waning interest and then CC had legal issues with Fox that lasted for years after the show ended. So even if he blamed outside forces for the show’s demise (while inwardly and secretly second guessing himself), the bottom line was that TXF didn’t end with a lot of good will from fans, critics or Fox. Even the staff was burnt out.

      With all due respect to them, I think eliminating William like this was taking the easy way out. Like you said, there were other things they could have done, they just would have involved a more carefully planned plot. But in the end, they couldn’t just ignore what happened to William anyway. They *still* had to plot around him.

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  14. You know how I normally rant on for ages.
    The only thing that came to mind at the end was: “Ugh. Are we there yet?”

    And it echoed in my mind like there were no words left.

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  17. I’m barren of emotion on this series at this point. I can only add I found the final decision to be more about sweeping little William under the rug for the writers than any sensible thing Scully would have done.

    Doggett and Reyes have again taken up residence on the bench..warming things up for the big team.

    I wasn’t invested in the story and I am just thinking what the finale is going to be like. I can’t even look forward to season 10 as I’ve seen and mostly forgot that already…sigh.

  18. They weren’t even trying at this point, were they?

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